Oh Ryanair, how I love you so. 

Last week I came across an article in the business section of Time and what caught my attention? Three words: Ryanair, standing, flight. 

The article, "New Low for Flying? Standing-Room-Only Flights Possible," informed me that the European low fare airline is currently attempting to launch a standing-room-only section on their aircrafts for short-distance flights within Europe. The cost you may ask? A whopping 1.50 USD without the airline administration fee, and with the fee flying one way the cost would most likely come out to be around $11.00 -- drastically less than even its cheapest flights currently. 

I'm not entirely sure how I feel about an airline who has a habit of having technical difficulties allowing standing-room tickets, but the student in me thinks it is a great idea. With the creation of a stand-room-only section the cost of all tickets will decrease, bring more name recognition and popularity to the airline, and maybe even make them a profit so they can fill the plane all the way with gas. It seems like a win-win in my mind. 

That being said, I do have my reservations about how safe it would be during the takeoff and landing but I think, like any student who wants to travel Europe, they would install some sort of handle bars both vertically and horizontally so you can brace yourself. I would hope. Then again I will contradict myself and say I recall reading that Michael O’Leary, CEO of Ryanair, did say that if an aircraft did crash a seatbelt would not save you. He is correct, but I just wonder what else he may skimp out on. Time will only tell, but for now I wish my flights all cost $11.oo. Viaja con Dios, lucky ducks. 
 
You're in Europe and you want to travel everywhere. A desire that is completely acceptable and quite the norm for travelers and citizens, the only snag is you're on a budget and a time crunch. So, you have to make decisions. Tough ones at that. 

Before coming to Spain I had a list of several countries I wanted to visit, I knew going in that it would cost a decent amount of money but as the economy changed in the United States so did the economy in Spain. As a result I have had to dwindle my list down to two more out of the country visits and a few city trips in Spain. A decision I am content with. 

There are cheap airlines in Europe, RyanAir and easyJet are the two I prefer. Well, maybe not RyanAir, but there are also buses that are inexpensive and trains that can take you to nearby cities for a decent price too. One thing to always remember when you are planning trips is the cost of food and lodging, something I didn't realize would influence my decision to cut down on travel as much as I thought. No one judges you for having a tight budget, especially if you're a college student. The reasons why I am heading to Lisbon, Portugal this weekend are because the transportation was fairly inexpensive, lodging was reasonable and the cost of food and other items are also fairly cheap. Everyone wants the same thing: a fun experience that doesn't break the bank and you can do that, you just have to be willing to look and make some tradeoffs.

After a nice long Skype session with my friend who is studying in Copenhagen, Denmark we have decided to rendezvous in Geneva, Switzerland in mid-December. It was one of the few locations her and I both could find cheap (well, cheap-ish) flights to. We wanted to travel to each others current homes, but both of us would have paid an ungastly amount of money, so we made one of those tradeoffs. For three days we will be hiking, sight-seeing, and eating all the fondue, cheese and bread possible. Geneva is an expensive place to travel in so we will cut back in other ways, like making sandwiches for lunch when we will be hiking, finding cheap places to sleep (but still secure so our mothers don't have a bird) and just being smart about what we really need to spend money on. I must admit, when I saw the Expatify.com breakdown of the ten cheapest countries I was excited to see Geneva on it, only then to be heartbroken when it was on there for being one of the most expensive cities in Europe, coming in at $111.49 US/day. My travel companion and I will not be touching that price mark, no way jose.

All in all, I am more than satisfied with the amount of traveling I will be doing. In Spain I will be heading to Barcelona and Sevilla at some point, though it is to be determined when, but I also am glad to spend time here in Madrid on weekends. There is plenty that I have not seen and I don't want to take the city for granted. I often think that students become enthralled in what country they can go to next, which is a good thing, but forget about the places they can go to within the country they are studying.
 
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Photo credit: Ryanair
We're college students who are studying abroad in Europe. By the time we come home our bank accounts will be crying themselves to sleep and we will be scraping the bottom of an empty well to pay for books. Naturally, with our desire to travel and determination to prevent this scenario from becoming reality we only saw one solution: book flights with Ryanair. Whoops. 

Ryanair, an Irish airline that operates throughout Europe, sells low-cost tickets that can't be beat by other airlines such as Easyjet, Air France and Iberia. However, lately the airline has seen some scrutiny after having several malfunctions including oxygen masks that failed to eject, loss of cabin pressure, failing to fill the plane's fuel tank efficiently and emergency landings over small technical malfunctions that the company refuses to expand upon. 

All in all, I think we made a great choice... 

I can't say that I am entirely surprised by how many issues Ryanair has had, but in all honesty, what airline doesn't have problems? We may not hear about issues other company's have because there is nothing that makes one extremely unique. What sets Ryanair apart from the others is its price and the probability of people who, like me, want to travel and not pay an arm and a leg. 

This isn't to say that I am not upset with the airline, I mean I would like to survive the three flights I have booked for this week, but there is nothing you can really do at this point except hope the company has increased its security like the news reports. I'm naturally an optimist if you couldn't tell. 

For those who are planning on studying abroad, don't be afraid of traveling on Ryanair and if you don't want to fly there are alternatives such as train or bus. 

Eight hours until flight one of three on Ryanair this week. Cross your fingers for a safe flight, but more for a fun time in Paris, France and Budapest, Hungary.