Thanksgiving was hard to celebrate away from our families, but it was also difficult to celebrate this year with the Madrid family because we were missing one key member, Dr. Eufemia Sanchez de la Calle. 

After Femy's death in September we all grieved in different ways. Some liked to talk about it, others kept their feelings quiet and some were upfront and said they didn't accept the fact that she was gone. I think I had a mixture of all three. For the past two months we all have been going about our daily routines and remembering Femy for the wonderful person she was when the topic came up, but none of us dwelled on her death and I think we all have moved on from it as best as we have been able to, however after receiving a comment on a blog entry I wrote on the death of Femy, the emotions could not help but come flooding back. 

Her name is Jackie Curbishley and she met Femy when she was an au pair in London, England. Curbishley shared a story that none of the students knew and after conversations with faculty here I don't think they did either. 

Excerpt: 
I first met her through one of my Spanish teachers when I was studying the language as a mature student in London. I was married with two children and a working mum. My teacher, Teresa Rubio told me she had met a young Spanish girl in Bourne & Hollingsworth (a famous old London store, now long gone,) one lunchtime. She said this girl had come to London via an agency in Spain as an au pair, for the purpose of learning English. The family she had been placed with were Indian, they spoke no English at home and wouldn't allow the girl to attend any classes. They had taken away her passport and she was allowed only one day a week off. 
This to me seemed like modern slavery, and ever the campaigner for liberty, I decided to free her.
I was in the music business in those days, managing bands like The Who, so I had access to some pretty heavy security men. That night I sent one of them to the address Teresa had given me with the express orders not to leave without the girl and her passport and if necessary, to call the police.
To cut a long story short, he had to call the police, but Femy arrived at my house that night, aged 23, nervous and bemused as she had no idea how this miracle had come about. 
So began a lifelong friendship. 

Not a single soul in our group knew this about Femy and I never would have expected it. When I first received the email with the blog comment I planned on reading it back at my piso, but decided to read it while I was around friends. As I read it aloud to Emily we both couldn't help up and think about how strong of a woman Femy was. No matter how difficult the situation was she never complained, she never let anyone know how she truly felt if she did not like something and she always turned a horrible situation into a positive one. 

As I continued to read the letter aloud to Emily we kept learning things about our dear Femy that we never knew. She lived with Curbishley and her family in England for three years, becoming fluent in English while she taught them Spanish; Femy was forced to withdraw from her education in Salamanca, Spain because her college grant was taken away due to austerity reasons; she thought the best way to learn English was to be a stewardess but she decided to be an au pair instead; when her college grant was reinstated she went back to her university in Salamanca and never mentioned how she was doing until she told her family and Jackie that she was getting her doctorate and heading to teach in Michigan as a professor. 

Emily asked a good question, how could we have known Femy so well but not have known all of this? Our minds were racing with questions but then we came to a conclusion: we were meant to receive this comment on Thanksgiving, when we all would be together later that evening and be able to process it together, just like we had two months earlier. 

I am not one for fate and I will be honest, I don't know if there is a higher power or not, but you can't help but think we were meant to receive this on a day where we would be missing our families and be leaning on one another already to help us forget about missing a family orientated holiday. 

When I posted the comment in our group Facebook page the responses were positive, one student even said they had chills. We all knew we lost an incredible women but we never knew she could continue to amaze us without even being present in our lives. Curbishley said it best in her closing statement:
 I will never forget her and we have all been touched by her to greater and lesser degrees. That was Femy. Always loving, always giving of herself, and always a shining example of the best of humanity. She will be sorely missed.
- Jackie Curbishley.

 
Oofta-weefta, I am exhausted. These past two weeks have been nothing but studying, reviewing, creating power points, writing essays and more for my mid-terms in all five of my classes. 

Whoever said there was no studying while you study abroad had it wrong. 

Last Friday was a day filled with two exams, one covered Hispanoamericana literature and the other was on old Castilian and mid-evil literature. If your mind just exploded trying to figure out what constitutes being either of those that, try studying it for five days straight.  

The weekend provided a little break but consisted of more studying in order to  prepare for my midterm in Spanish culture on Monday, and theology on Tuesday, but nothing prepared me for advanced grammar Tuesday afternoon. That was just brutal and worth 40 percent of my grade. Can't wait to see that...

Wednesday was a recooperacion for last weeks Theology classes where we presented a power point presentation on a book in the Bible. It  was a grand three and a half hours straight of Theology. Judith, my assigned book and biblical figure, and I are now best buds after all the time we have doesn't together this past week. 

I will admit it is a little aggravating seeing all the photos and hearing all the stories of people studying abroad via other programs through Marquette that do not have as heavy of a course load it would seem. The students here in the Marquette en Madrid program and I have all expressed the desire to be able to travel for a week and not have to worry about the repercussions of missing classes, or being severely behind on assignments and material but unfortunately we can't so we take it with a grain of salt and use the three day weekends to our advantage. After these mid-terms I could use a vacay and look forward to Barcelona and Brussels in the coming two weeks. For now, I will just live vicariously via students studying in the King's College program in London, England or the John Cabot University program in Rome, Italy.