As I head out for my last night out in Madrid one thing comes to my mind is how I am greatly going to miss the transportation. It is so easy here and I know I am always a short walk from a metro, bus stop, or even a street that takes me directly to my piso. Madrid's size is deceiving and is completely walkable, but yet it still has great mass transit. I don't look forward to the transportation back home. Pardon my blunt opinion, but it sucks. On the bright side this makes wandering off campus unlikely and means more time on campus and having enjoyable evenings at places that are literally only a few blocks away. That means I can always just dash away without having to figure out any transportation except the form Mother Nature granted me, my own two legs. That will be nice. 
 
Short one today because I am feeling overwhelmed with a difficult final in Advanced Grammar. 

I am going to miss being constantly surrounded by different cultures and languages. Madrid, Spain is a hub for all European cultures and it has been incredible to witness the ability of language and culture to transcend barriers. I find myself thinking about how diverse Europe is and how plain the U.S. can be. However, I look forward to going home and looking more closely at the different cultures there are. I think I will be looking at things with fresh eyes for a while and I'm excited for that. 
 
In the spirit of finals I have decided to write a countdown post on the importance of grades. 

Students at Marquette University found out their final grades yesterday, just when I am beginning to take my finals here in Madrid at the Complutense. Unlike back in the U.S. I will not know my grades until the end of January, a good yet also bad thing for if I did not pass a class I will not have been informed until it is too late to take up another class at MU. But let's just hope that is not the case. 

Here grades are somewhat important to Spanish students. After a conversation with one of the directors here I found that receiving a six out of the 10 point scale that is doing well. I'm sorry but what? When I first heard this I didn't understand. Paloma continues to explain that as long as you pass that is what matters, your GPA is irrelevant. After the explanation I realized I could definitely get used to that. The professors here are not accustom to the U.S. grading scale and do not quite grasp the fact that you need a high grade to pass the class and an even higher grade for it to count for your major. I am not going to miss the continuous stress over whether they will grade on the Complutense scale or our scale, it's just too stressful and I can't count on one hand, even two for that matter, how many conversations and panic stricken moments I have had over this. I look forward to getting back to the normal grading scale. Less anxiety will be had that way. 

On the other hand I am going to miss how calm the professors are when it comes to exams. They consistently reassure us that we will do great. Easier said than done, yes, but it does help. How much faith I have in that statement is questionable, I will just have to wait until the end of January to find out. Cross your fingers for nothing lower than a C people.
 
Short and sweet one for today. 

With four days left we are all cramming for our exams and thinking about how we have to pack up our lives once again and move on. I'm going to miss the simplicity of my life here, but I look forward to unpacking my life once again and being settled until I graduate and start my next life adventure. 
 
Each night after I eat dinner around 9:30 p.m. I am ready to sleep. I become so stuffed I can't fathom doing anything but star-fishing on the bed and relaxing for a bit, but I can't. I have to be strong willed and complete more homework and items on my to-do list. After being here for the semester my body has adjusted to eating late in the evening, except the longing to face plant on my bed has not disappeared. At first I was alway starving by 7:00 p.m. and thought I would never be able to adjust to eating so late, however my body has shocked me by its ability to adapt and now I have found that I love eating later in the evening, even when I have more work to do after. I will miss the late night dinners and having a nice study break around 9:00 each night, but I will be taking this Spanish custom back to the U.S. and can't wait to eat later in the evenings, around 7:30 or 8:00, each day. It's a great way to avoid the cravings for a late night snack and munching. 
 
I love food. There is no doubt about this statement. If there is food in front of me I will eat it, it's a curse.

Today I will be learning how to cook some of the delicious meals Irene has made for me and I am beyond excited. I already have my notepad and pen ready and the cooking extravaganza does not even begin until 6:00 this evening. 
I am not a good cook, I take after my mother that way who can make the staples: chicken, goulash, pastas, potatoes, etc. but she can make a mean stuffed manicotti and chili. My mouth is watering just thinking about it. 

This semester I have been spoiled. Irene is one of the best cooks I have ever met and I have certainly not starved or dwindled away in the last five months. Her homemade soups and authentic Spanish dishes she learned to cook from her mother have left me stuffed each evening and I dread the day I leave and have to cook for myself. I'm going to forever miss her wicked croquetas and carrot soup. However, I am excited to go back and devour a Chipotle burrito and eat two bowls of my mothers chili after shoveling the snow that is accumulating in Minneapolis.  This is going to be such a bitter sweet goodbye. No pun intended. 
 
People are everywhere in Madrid. On any given day you see a new fashion statement, new person in your apartment building, and an unfamiliar face in your class. However, even in the densely populated city of 3.3 million you run into the same people who you live by or take the bus with when you are out and about in a different area of the city. 

It is refreshing to wake up and head out the door knowing you are going to have another day of first sightings. I am definitely going to miss people watching and always meeting someone new. Being an extrovert really pays off in the third largest city in the European Union. Though, as much as I love meeting new people in Madrid I look forward to meeting new people at Marquette. I haven't had a semester yet where I haven't made another lifelong friend and I can't wait until I am back at my home base meeting and greeting the new people at my work, in my classes, and my apartment building. It will be strange not having to give two besitos on the cheeks though, I love that custom here. Maybe I can bring it back to the good old 414 and it will catch on... 
 
You know those days when all you want to do is call a friend to chat because you have time to kill? I remember those days, and they are fast approaching. This countdown post is short and sweet. 

I can't wait for the day where I have time to kill between class or meetings and I can just press call and not have to worry about a time change. It will be nice to have that luxury. On the other hand I will miss the twenty minute email spree with my friends and family. There is something about refreshing your inbox multiple times in twenty minutes and each time there is a response to an email you just sent. I takes me back to those good old middle school days. Gotta love 'em.
 
Today we hit the single digits. What. A. Scary. Thing. 

I have mixed feelings about going home. I want to see my family and friends and get back to my normal life where I have no time to rest, but I also want to stay here and keep practicing Spanish and experiencing the culture. Oh how a mind and soul can be torn. So, in the spirit of being indecisive and unable to make up my mind this countdown post is related to modes of communication. 

In the United States I don't like how I am never unreachable. Some times I just want to shut my phone off for a few days but know that would not be goof for a.) my mother's sanity and b.) my career. Here, I am reachable by email, social networking and my small Yoigo cell phone that has no data plan and currently does not work. I like it but I don't like it at the same time. When I really need to get a hold of someone my phone either does not work or I have no euros left on it. However, I like the fact that I can go about my day and have no distractions and walk along the streets and not be texting, but rather looking at the scenery around me. It's nice to have both hands free the majority of the time. I'm going to miss being unreachable because it means I won't have time all to myself where someone couldn't interrupt me. However, I am looking forward to having my data plan and GoogleMaps directions at the tip of my fingers. Being directionally challenged is hard. I also know that my mother will be at peace when she knows she can just call my normal phone number and hear my voice. It will be nice to hear hers too. 
 
On the bus this morning I ran into some of my Spanish friends I made here in Madrid and I became a little emotional. I have formed very strong bonds and relationships with people this semester and I don't want to say goodbye. I didn't think it was going to be this hard. 

We joke about them coming to the United States and then they ask what there is to do in Minnesota. I say, with a quizzical face: "Hike? Fish? Walk around the lakes? Go up north to more lakes?" And they are unimpressed. Needless to say that is not their cup of tea. At the end of these conversations I alway end up saying I will be coming back to them, and it is true. 

I'm going to miss all the ties I have made in Madrid, but I know it is not goodbye, it is a see you soon. 

On the other end of the spectrum I can not wait to be reunited with my friends back home. I haven't seen some of my friends in Minnesota in over six months since I stayed in Milwaukee for the summer for an internship with Tap Milwaukee. I miss them dearly. As for my friends in Milwaukee, they have had a blast in their first semester in off-campus housing and I can't wait to get back and start my experience outside of a dorm too. It is bitter sweet saying goodbye to your friends on one continent knowing you are going back to others, but that is why you say "Hasta luego" rather than "Adios".